Majorca Island (Mallorca Island) - Travel Guide and Travel Info

Majorca is one of Spain’s Balearic Islands, surrounded by the warm Mediterranean Sea and enjoying balmy temperatures all year round. It’s most famous for clubbing, but there’s so much more to see here, from family-friendly resorts to amazing mountains. 


There are 41 Blue Flag beaches in Majorca, which means they are certified as being clean, safe and sustainable. Some of the most popular include Santa Ponsa, where you can enjoy a boat trip to Dragonera Island, and Cala Mondrago, which is an unspoilt paradise in the south that sits inside a nature reserve. The beaches around Magaluf will soon be known as the Calvia Beach Resort, bringing a mix of classy bars, restaurants and waterside sports to the area as well as the famous Nikki Beach Club. 



The capital city is Palma, which sits in a beautiful Horseshoe bay in the south west of the island. As well as hosting Majorca’s airport, Palma is worth a visit for its large range of art galleries and museums, including Es Baluard (for contemporary art), Kristian Krekovic and Ferrán Cano. Most cultural attractions cost only a few Euros to visit, whilst the Military Museum is free. As the sun goes down, head to La Llonja for a range of eateries including local dishes and international food. 



Family holidays in Majorca are packed full of things to do. Children are made very welcome and there’s a wide range of activities they will love, from snorkelling in the sea to visiting one of the many water parks, such as the HidroPark and Marineland. Castles for little adventurers to conquer include Capdepera, a large fortress near Arta, and Santueri Castle in Felanitx, or you could hire a car and drive up to the mountainside Santuari de Sant Salvador for panoramic views across the island (and a café at the top!). Children will also enjoy exploring the sculpture gardens and arts activities at the Yannick and Ben Jakober Foundation near Alcudia. 


If you really want to let your hair down then the towns of Magaluf, Alcudia and Santa Ponsa are ideal. Boasting a range of clubs and bars, from the largest nightclub in Europe to a Roman-themed night spot with an indoor pool, there’s something for everyone. Palma’s city centre is also open to partygoers until the small hours, though it’s a little more diverse, with blues bars and Latino music also featured. 


Sports lovers often flock to Majorca, thanks to its great reputation for tennis players and cyclists. Visit the town of Manacor, home to tennis pro Rafael Nadal, which is inland on the east coast. You might just catch a glimpse of him dining at his favourite restaurant in neighbouring Son Servera! Thanks to the great weather here, it’s easy to find a court and follow in Nadal’s footsteps. Meanwhile cyclists can regularly be found training in the Tramuntana Mountains, along with rock climbers and hikers. The mountain range is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 


If you’re after a bit more culture then don’t forget to visit the towns surrounding the Tramuntana Mountains and discover Majorca’s arts legacy. Deia is a fascinating town on the North West coast, once home to the poet and author Robert Graves, and you can walk around the museum that was created in his cliff top house. Just along the coastline is Valldemossa, where the composer Chopin briefly lived, and which now hosts regular classical music events. 


Puerto Soller and Puerto Pollensa are two other spots not to miss on a holiday to Majorca. Soller is a very picturesque Majorcan town and you can take boat trips from the port or just watch the yachts glide past. Alternatively, why not catch the 100-year-old Soller Railway, which runs from the harbour to Palma City? This takes you through the mountains and is a tourist must-do. Meanwhile Puerto Pollensa was the inspiration for one of Agatha Christie’s short stories and she stayed at the Hotel Illa D’Or on her travels. 


When you’re visiting Majorca, make a beeline for the markets and restaurants offering authentic Majorcan food. Light bites include olives, almonds and gorgeous pastries such as Ensaimadas, the distinctive curled dough snacks filled with fruit jams. Hot favourites such as Tumbet (a sort of ratatouille suitable for vegetarians), fish soup or Sobrasada sausage mean that you’ll never go hungry. 

So, what are you waiting for? Majorca is a diverse and exciting place for a holiday, whether you want to relax and soak up the culture or you’d rather be up all night. 

Majorca map
About the Author: Polly Allen is a travel writer and journalist who currently discovers amazing destinations in Europe for easyJet Holidays.